Annual Denison Gathering in Naples

Annual Denison Gathering in Naples

Thursday, February 21, 2019 9:00 am EST to 2:00 pm EST

Hilton Naples

5111 Tamiami Trail North
Naples, FL, US 34103

Register for this Event

Denison is coming to Naples!

Join us at the Hilton Naples to hear from Denison’s Director of Off-Campus Study, Professor Katy Crossley-Frolick, and enjoy a special talk by distinguished alumnus Tony P. Hall ’64, a former ambassador to the United Nations and a U.S. Congressman for more than two decades. A social time and luncheon will follow the program.
We’re certain you’ll find the presentations to be both fascinating and enlightening, and the fellowship is sure to be both fun and lively.

Cost for this event is $25 per person, which includes lunch. Please contact the Office of Alumni & Family Engagement with questions by email at alumni@denison.edu or by phone at 740-587-5659.

Program

  • 9 a.m. – Check-in, coffee, and conversation
  • 9:45 a.m. – “Problems Without Passports, Learning Across Continents” by presented by  Professor Katy Crossley-Frolick
  • 11 a.m. – “How my Denison Education Prepared Me for a Life in International Public Service” by Ambassador Tony Hall ’64
  • noon – Social Time
  • 12:30 p.m. – Lunch

About Dr. Crossley-Frolick’s Talk

The term “wicked problems” was first introduced in 1973 by two professors of urban planning and design at the University of California, Berkeley. They used the term to highlight the relationship between social problems of the 1960s and early 1970s, and the apparent failure of public institutions to remedy them. Today, the idiom is widely invoked to describe problems such as climate change, poverty, mass migration, and terrorism. These problems are remarkably resistant to conventional or simple solutions and beyond the capabilities of any single country. They are, to quote the late UN Secretary General, Kofi Annan, “problems without passports.” This is the world Denison students will inherit post-graduation, a world where there is a pressing need for talent, creativity, and intellectual dexterity to confront these problems and chart a path forward. How do global learning opportunities at Denison prepare our students for these challenges? What are the skills and competencies that they gain from them?

About Ambassador Hall’s Talk

Three times nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize, Ambassador Hall is a leading advocate for hunger relief programs and improving human rights in the world. He is the executive director of the Alliance to End Hunger, engaging diverse institutions in building the public and political will to end hunger at home and abroad. He meets regularly with Members of Congress to encourage them to become more actively engaged on hunger issues. Ambassador Hall served as the U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Agencies for Food and Agriculture in Rome, Italy, from 2002 to 2005. Prior to his diplomatic service, Ambassador Hall represented the Third District of Ohio in the U.S. Congress for 24 years, their longest serving representative in history. A founding member of the Select Committee on Hunger, he served as its chairman from 1989 to 1993. Ambassador Hall earned his B.A. at Denison in 1964 and was an All-American football player for the Big Red. He has been honored by Denison with both an honorary doctorate and the prestigious Alumni Citation.


Please contact the Office of Alumni & Family Engagement with questions by email at alumni@denison.edu or by phone at 740-587-5659.

We hope to see you there!